Jose Aldo’s advice to younger self: Instead of fighting, play soccer

In a recent video interview with Spanish-language site MMA.Uno, Jose Aldo revealed that he doesn't feel left out, when it comes to the blockbuster…

By: Tim Bissell | 7 years ago
Jose Aldo’s advice to younger self: Instead of fighting, play soccer
Bloody Elbow 2.0 | Anton Tabuena

In a recent video interview with Spanish-language site MMA.Uno, Jose Aldo revealed that he doesn’t feel left out, when it comes to the blockbuster Brazilian-heavy card at this weekend’s UFC 198.

Saturday’s UFC 198: Werdum vs. Miocic takes place at the Arena da Baixada in Curitiba, Brazil. The stadium, which sits over 40,000 people, is the regular home of Brazilian soccer team Clube Atlético Paranaense. The event itself features, along with heavyweight champion Fabricio Werdum, iconic Brazilian fighters such as Vitor Belfort and Mauricio ‘Shogun’ Rua.

Aldo (per MMA.Uno‘s Andrés Lichtveld) told the Spanish-speaking site that despite UFC 198 being held in a what will likely be a raucous stadium atmosphere, he prefers being booked at UFC 200.

“I already did it in Canada,” said Aldo, referring to his successful UFC featherweight title defense versus Mark Hominick in Toronto’s Rogers Centre stadium at UFC 129 in 2011. “So for me, it’s an honor to be in UFC 200.”

Regarding his UFC 200 match, Aldo stated that he is ‘hungry’ to regain a UFC championship title and that he sees the Edgar fight as a first step towards doing just that.

Aldo also took the opportunity to restate that he believes, based on what he has done in his career thus far, that he deserved an “immediate rematch” versus current UFC featherweight champ Conor McGregor.

Despite losing his title to McGregor at UFC 194 in December, Aldo remarked that Brazilian fans continue to treat him as if he was, “still the champion.”

Aldo also talked about the upcoming release (June 6th) of Mais forte que o mundo – A historia de Jose Aldo (Stronger than the world – the story of Jose Aldo), a movie based on the fighter’s formative years in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro, leading up to his signing with the WEC and UFC.

Aldo admitted to being nervous ahead of the release, but said he hoped the film would, “inspire people to choose a good path in their lives.”

When asked what he would tell a ten-year-old version of himself, Aldo – who is well known for his love of ‘the beautiful game’ – gave an interesting answer.

“Maybe instead of a fighter, I would tell him to become a soccer player,” he said, jokingly.

Share this story

About the author
Tim Bissell
Tim Bissell

Tim Bissell is a writer, editor and deputy site manager for Bloody Elbow. He has covered combat sports since 2015. Tim covers news and events and has also written longform and investigative pieces. Among Tim's specialties are the intersections between crime and combat sports. Tim has also covered head trauma, concussions and CTE in great detail.

Tim is also BE's lead (only) sumo reporter. He blogs about that sport here and on his own substack, Sumo Stomp!

Email me at tim@bloodyelbow.com. Nice messages will get a response.

More from the author

Bloody Elbow Podcast
Related Stories